The 3D and VR Design Gap with Taylor Freeman of Upload IO

November 16, 2017

I’ve got introduced to someone that as I was starting to talk with him I thought, “I'm not just going to write an Inc. article about this. I'm going to air the audio for you.” I think it has such great relevance in some of the many things we've talked about filling the design gap. In this case, I’m talking with Taylor Freeman of Upload.io. They are a company that are in San Francisco and Marina del Rey that has these amazing classes that are teaching virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality, X reality. It’s just an amazing company that is building the University of the Future. They have the coolest space. I’ve got a little sneak preview from Taylor. I am now going to take Tom and we're going to go up there in the next months because it is just such a cool space to look at but such cool tools to play with. I just really thought that you would find this really interesting and really start talking about how the skills that you might be building over in 3D design really translate themselves into becoming virtual reality designers, augmented reality designers, really build this future of this idea of marketing all the way through to product, through 3D printed on-demand end results. I love that idea. I really thought you should hear this. Let's go to my interview with Taylor Freeman.

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3D Printing Glass with Eran Gal-or of Micron3DP

November 9, 2017

We’re going to take a real journey down a very old and really ancient material that has been used on this earth, manipulated by men for thousands of years and learn how one company is actually harnessing it and has now been able to control it through 3D printing. It’s actually very exciting. The company is MICRON3DP and they’re a company out of Israel. I’m going to have an interview with Eran Gal-or who is one of two partners in this company. Technically, he’s an industrial designer but he’s the CTO. They came up with the seed of this idea many years ago. The company is now been in existence for two years. It’s impressive what they have done.

I actually have some experience with glass as a material as a design student and then even after design school, going and taking a class or two at certain places in Corning, New York and others around glassblowing. It really is an ancient craft. If you’ve never had the chance to go to Corning, New York and take a tour of some of the museums there and the factories going on and demonstrations they have, I highly recommend it. It’s quite something to learn about certainly how glass has been manipulated and manufactured over time here in the United States. Glass has been around for thousands of years and has been manipulated for ages. It’s one of the primary materials probably along with clay and wood that some of the materials that had been manipulated by men from the earliest of times. Now, MICRON3DP is doing it in a 3D printer. They have invented this way to manipulate it. MIT had also experimented with it and was developing it but MICRON3DP has taken it a lot farther.

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3D Print Meetups with Chris Kaminsky of MI3D

November 2, 2017

On today’s episode, we’re going back into our past stomping grounds as we were new people in business and industry. Reminiscing about Grand Rapids, Michigan which is one of the first places we live for a number of years and decided intentionally to go there for business purposes. There’s a guy named Chris Kaminsky who has started Mi3D for Michigan and has a Meetup group and association about 3D printing there in West Michigan. This is reminding us of how we were involved in multiple pre MeetUp.com meetups back in the day when we were there and we were young. Tracy remembers sitting in some pizza place or something with Tom while he was trying to do a 3D Studio meetup of some kind. There were some of those early CAD meetups because 3D CAD was really new. There wasn’t too many people who did it. They were very, very expensive systems like Alias on Silicon Graphics workstations that were six-figure systems. Your average people couldn’t afford that, big corporations only. Then there came this lower cost CAD and it started with 3D Studio, which had in the early day’s release 1 and release 2 back then. This was the early to mid-90s. People were really new to it and wanted to know about it and you would get together about all the CAD. We were using CAD and creating models and animations of products that we had designed and that was the real innovative thing.

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3D Print Ecosystems, End To End, with Arden Rosenblatt of PieceMaker Technologies

October 26, 2017

Today, I’ve got a really interesting conversation to share with you that I had recently with Arden Rosenblatt of PieceMaker.com. This is a company that has really dealt with how to bring 3D printing to mass market retail. They’ve dealt with all of the systems involved in that. It’s really fascinating. I’ve often talked with a lot of different people that are working on different pieces of the puzzle. This is a company that really has had to create an end-to-end solution, dealing with content to how would people interface and interact with it then actually having it printed right there for them at a physical location in a museum gift shop or retail store. They’ve also gone on to do other kinds of solutions, a little more business to business, but it’s really all centered around the same thing. How to help companies, especially big brands, take advantage of the opportunities that additive manufacturing, in particular 3D printing, offers. I hope you really will enjoy it. Let’s go to the interview with Arden and then I’ll talk to you a little bit more on the other side.

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3D Print Hacking Mastermind with Anil Pattni of TinyHackerHouse

October 20, 2017

We are going to talk about hacking and making today. It’s hacking in a general sense. It’s a definition. Broadly used hacking is the way we’re talking about it today; involved in everything from real hackers in makerspaces to even also incubator-level hacking with software and life hacking. Anil Pattni who I got to meet at the FREECon, the Freelance Conference in Austin, Texas which we went to. It was so interesting to meet him. It was ironic because he started doing some of the first OC Maker Faire stuff here in Orange County, California and yet we met him in Austin, Texas which is where he is now. It was like, “How did we not meet you before?” that kind of thing.

He’s been running a lot of Meetups. He did 200 Meetups. They were one of the first hacker Maker Faire things that happened on MeetUp.com. Those really all happened in Southern California. They happened all in Orange County here. I thought it was so interesting this idea because we have a friend, Mickey Ackerman, who was one of Tom’s professors and Department Head at that time at Rhode Island School Design. He does something similar but not on this grassroots low level. They do it at a very top level where they do and they get people from diverse walks of life and areas to try to hack a solution to a big societal problem. You want to brainstorm at a large level and that’s the kind of word we’re using hacking for here. That’s the term that we’re using it for. It’s the same thing but at a much smaller level like being able to do it local and freelancers get grouping together. I love the idea of it. I just think it really makes a lot of sense. It seems to go in lots of different directions the way that they're doing it. It really is not tightly defined. They're trying to be flexible and allow and help foster people really being innovative especially in startups but also to assist other companies that are not startups in outside the box thinking to achieve some bigger goals, innovation and collaboration together.

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3D Print Bump Stocks

October 12, 2017

In light of the recent events in Las Vegas, Tom and Tracy talk about 3D print bump stocks. This is not a statement or debate about the Second Amendment or even of the legality of things, but more of a discussion about the ethical, moral and even physical risks that designers must think about when creating something.

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Finding a 3D Print Manufacturer with Jason Ray of Paperless Parts

October 5, 2017

We got an interesting episode today. We've got a guest who’s been on before, Jason Ray. It was December 2016 for something called Sightline Maps, which we loved the project because we think it’s really cool, topographically three-dimensionally mapping for government use, for school uses. The idea was that you would topographically print them on 3D printers so schools would learn what the stuff look like. He’s come back to use because he’s working on a new venture. It’s called Paperless Parts. It is a new kind of a service for getting quotes and finding a 3D print manufacturer to work with for making 3D print manufactured products. At the same time, sometimes it’s getting your first part. Getting that, “Is this manufacture-able in 3D printing and what’s the quality of it?” We call them design sign-off samples. That’s a really critical important part in our design process with our clients. I think it is for a lot of people. It’s one thing to print it on your own printer, but at the end of the day, you need to go ahead and make it in the final material, in the final version that you’re going to do. That design sign-off sample is important to get quoted and help establish whether or not a 3D print manufacturer is a good quality 3D print manufacturer.

To send us a message, go to 3dstartpoint.com or shoot us a message at info@3dstartpoint.com or on our facebook or twitter! Its absolutely free, so ask away and and don’t forget to subscribe so you can hear more on our regularly scheduled Thursday podcast episodes!

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Building Your Own Food 3D Printer with Nina Hoff of ByFlow

September 28, 2017

We're going to interview Nina Hoff of byFlow. She's the CEO of a Dutch company that specializes in 3D printing for some time but they really spun this off and started this company in 2015 in which she is the CEO. She's a very young 25-year-old CEO, which we think is amazing. It's a company she has with her brother and her father and a couple of other partners as well. We just love the idea of really getting something that's so mainstream in terms of food 3D printing, finally.

To send us a message, go to 3dstartpoint.com or shoot us a message at info@3dstartpoint.com or on our facebook or twitter! Its absolutely free, so ask away and and don’t forget to subscribe so you can hear more on our regularly scheduled Thursday podcast episodes!

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Disaster Zone 3D Printing with Field Ready

September 27, 2017

Tom and Tracy reads out a statement by Dr. Eric James of Field Ready to spread the word and get some help for their GoFundMe for those who feel so inclined to donate. It would help the use of 3D printing in disaster zones that Field Ready is working with right now due to the recent hurricanes.

To send us a message, go to 3dstartpoint.com or shoot us a message at info@3dstartpoint.com or on our facebook or twitter! Its absolutely free, so ask away and and don’t forget to subscribe so you can hear more on our regularly scheduled Thursday podcast episodes!

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Affordable Textile Printing with 3D Print Parts with Charlie Runckel of FabricZoom

September 21, 2017

Today, we’ve got an interview that’s going to be a little bit different. It’s definitely 3D print related but it’s in a very different way. I wanted some prefaces for all our listeners saying while this isn’t absolutely the deepest 3D print subject, it’s still really cool and there are a lot of parallels with the 3D print industry and a lot to learn from it. Especially if you are involved in a 3D print startup that’s maybe making a new machine or even if you’re in the education space. I think there are a lot of great nuggets here for you.

We’re going to talk to Charlie Runckel of FabricZoom. It is an affordable fabric printer that uses off-the-shelf 3D print parts to have created its initial beta run here. They are based outside of Portland, in Beaverton, Oregon. The team had been coming up and thinking about how to make an affordable fabric printer. They were looking the cost of all of the parts and all of the time it would take to develop it. What they’ve come up with is just great. They really modeled what the 3D print industry has done.

We’re thinking about those first 3D printers where they were $3,000 and all of that or even they started in the kit world, but they were all using these off-the-shelf parts. They were really building up from there.

Many of them still use off-the-shelf parts especially stepper motors and printheads and things like that. You can buy off-the-shelf parts and make your own 3D printer. Really they apply that same technology using some of the actual motors and different things that 3D printers use and are made of today to make this fabric printer. They had to go beyond that because they’re not 3D printing. It’s either so many parallels. To me, I was so excited for this interview after having gone through it because there are a lot of lessons in what they’ve done to execute their vision and their goal that I think a lot of 3D print startups should model for their business.

We just really wanted to bring this to you. We thought it was of interest to the general maker community as a whole, which you guys are. We thought that would be of interest to you as well. There are many of you who have makerspaces who also do costume design and other things as well, school systems and educators who do all that. We thought this would be very interesting to raise awareness of it as well. It excited both of us.

I hope you really enjoy this interview as much as we did. Even though it’s not 100% strictly about 3D printing, I still think you’re going to enjoy it.

 

To send us a message, go to 3dstartpoint.com or shoot us a message at info@3dstartpoint.com or on our facebook or twitter! Its absolutely free, so ask away and and don’t forget to subscribe so you can hear more on our regularly scheduled Thursday podcast episodes!

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